Fall weather

Monday I drove to Ipswich, taking three finished pieces for the Crane Estate art show and sale (Honestly, I am never sure what parts of that need capitalizing; too many and I feel like Pooh, not enough and I am closer to e.e.cummings). Two small works, one Milkweed and one Sumac, and the large shell button river.

The weather was damp and drizzly all the way there and back, which served to show off what had to be peak foliage along the way. The weather on the coast was substantially more exciting, with a combination of new moon tides and north east winds throwing the ocean around. I walked briefly around the outside of the Crane house, and started home again.

I think my next projects are more small works focusing on the fall leaves, berries and flowers that hang on after the first frost.

headed to Crane Estate

Milkweed and staghorn sumac finished, framed and ready to travel. The first weekend in November is the Crane Estate Art Show and Sale, to benefit the Massachusetts Trustees of Reservations. There’s a fancy meet and greet Friday evening, (nice canapes) and then the entire thing is open to the public and free on Saturday and Sunday. I’ve been lucky to participate for several years now. Seeing what other artists bring is amazing, and seeing what people buy is educational.

I have these two small pieces (6×6″) for the small works section, and I’m bringing the shell button river for a large piece. I hope someone will want it!

Shell Button River

Notecards For Sale!!

Sets of six notecards, three each of two different designs. Puffins! Whales! Size is 4.5×5.25″comes with envelopes, perfect for gifts or thank you notes. Or just stick them on your wall. $15, plus a little for shipping.

And for the landscape aficionados, a set of  six different landscapes, 5×7″ with envelopes. Gifts, thank you notes, elegant decor – you decide. $18, plus a little for shipping.

I am suffering from a pitched battle with formatting and payment issues – if you’d like cards, email me, and we’ll figure it out.

high water

high water Sunderland

There is a very brief moment in New England where the snow melts, the ground melts  as well, but slower, and the earth is covered with water; running down hillsides, filling and over-filling rivers and ponds, spreading into glinting puddles in fields before they can be tilled.

Before the water can completely consume the landscape, the ground melts, and the surface water sinks in to be ground water, or flows down the tilted landscape to the ocean. At the moment the water begins to disappear, the green begins. Trees standing with their roots still covered by water start pushing the first sprightly bits of color. The first green is so intoxicating – these absurd flashes of chartreuse and brilliant reds at the very tips of the branches.

detail, high water South Deerfield